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Sociology

This Research Guide outlines information about topics relevant to the field of sociology, including information about careers.

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Also known as scholarlyrefereed, peer reviewed, or academic articles.

Why use journal articles?

  • Current: include current information and have a frequent publication cycle
  • Written by Scholars - based on research and expertise
  • Focused - detailed and focused on a narrow topic
  • Peer-Reviewed - reviewed and approved by subject area experts before publication

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Books IconIn general, be sure to use books written for an academic or scholarly audience instead of those written for a popular audience.

Why use books?

  • Depth - provide in-depth analysis of a topic
  • Broad Coverage - provide broad coverage over one or more topics
  • Comprehension - can help you understand a complex topic; books are easier to read than journal articles

 

Remember!

  • You may only need to read one chapter of a scholarly book.
  • Books contain less recent information due to the lengthy publication process.

Search for E-books:

E-books provided by library databases can be read online and provide options for searching the entire content of the book so that you can skip directly to the sections of the book focused on your topic.

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NOTE: This does not search all of PCC Library's e-book databases.


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Why Use Statistics?

                            Reporting hard data will add substance to your sociological research. Remember, data can be represented in different ways. 

Examples:

  • Statistics - One number summarizing a data set (Exs. mean, median)
  • Tabular Data - data represented in a table
  • Graphical Data - data represented in a graph or chart

Find Statistics and Data:

The Internet offers a wide variety of information. Carefully choosing and using Internet resources can be very beneficial to your research.

Why Use Websites?

Be aware that information on the internet is not regulated for quality or accuracy, so it is important for you to evaluate the source. Try the evaluation criteria under Evaluating Information to decide when you can use information.

Suggested Websites for Sociology:

The American Sociological Association is the national scholarly society for sociologists. Here, learn about ASA's history, mission, and resources for members.

The Association for Applied and Clinical Sociology (AACS) is a resource promoting integrative approaches and systems perspectives for analyzing complex problems and developing creative, practical solutions.

The SSSP's stated purpose is to promote and protect sociological research and teaching on significant problems of social life and, particularly, to encourage the work of young sociologists; to stimulate the application of scientific method and theory to the study of vital social problems; to encourage problem-centered social research; to foster cooperative relations among persons and organizations engaged in the application of scientific sociological findings to the formulation of social policies; to foster higher quality of life, social welfare, and positive social relations in society and the global community and to undertake any activity related thereto or necessary or desirable for the accomplishment of the foregoing purposes.