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ENG 111: Basic Research

This guide will introduce you to research and writing for English courses

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Also known as scholarlyrefereed, peer reviewed, or academic articles.

Why use journal articles?

  • Current: include current information and have a frequent publication cycle
  • Written by Scholars - based on research and expertise
  • Focused - detailed and focused on a narrow topic
  • Peer-Reviewed - reviewed and approved by subject area experts before publication

Search for Journal Articles:

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In this database, enter your title and hit "search"

 

Books IconIn general, be sure to use books written for an academic or scholarly audience instead of those written for a popular audience.

Why use books?

  • Depth - provide in-depth analysis of a topic
  • Broad Coverage - provide broad coverage over one or more topics
  • Comprehension - can help you understand a complex topic; books are easier to read than journal articles

 

Remember!

  • You may only need to read one chapter of a scholarly book.
  • Books contain less recent information due to the lengthy publication process.
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                            Literary Criticism refers to the act of interpreting and studying literature.

How to Analyze Literary Criticism?

Using library resources, you will put the literary work in its context, meaning you need to say something about the author, his or her life, and why he or she wrote that particular literary work.

Steps to begin:

  1. Read
  2. Develop a Thesis
  3. Do Research
  4. Find Support
  5. Edit!

Literary Criticism in Databases

In this database, enter the title of your text and "search."

To the left, you will see "Explore," and "Literary Criticisms" listed below.

Enter your title, and hit "search." On the left, under "Content Type," click "Criticism."

Then, apply filters.

Off-Campus Access

Paw: Indicates that a password is needed to access the resource from off campus.The username and password to access databases from off campus is the same as what you use to access the PCC portal (myPittCC) and Moodle. DO NOT include the last part of your email address (@my.pittcc.edu) in the username. Generic logins are available to community residents with PCC library cards, and others who are enrolled in or are affiliated with PCC programs and continuing education courses. Have questions? Ask us!